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Saxum


Client:
Renzi Stone

Project Type:
2-Story interior renovation

Construction Type:
-

Location:
Oklahoma City

Square Footage:
12,500

Saxum occupies the fifth and sixth floor penthouse of The Heritage, formerly the Journal Record Building, overlooking The Oklahoma City National Memorial. Once a rooftop, the newly added penthouse serves as the main entrance. This floor offers expansive 360-degree views including downtown, state Capitol, American Indian Cultural Center site, Innovation District, Midtown District and Automobile Alley. The overall space has a strong rectilinear design accentuated by raw steel and wood finishes. The layout embraces Saxum’s mobile and untethered work style offering a variety of unique nooks, flexible work lounges and meeting spaces. It serves as a public area that staff can use as a secondary location to accomplish work. The most prominent feature is five striking, 12-feet long polycarbonate and glass light boxes. They were designed to cover existing openings made in the concrete slab. Each light box represents Saxum’s core values: Brave, Original, Lively, Driven and Bold. They provide multiple uses as a work surface, sound barrier, light source and visual connectivity between the two floors. An additional notable feature is the steel-clad walls with hidden doors. This design element identifies the CEO’s private meeting room and office.

 

Providing direct accessibility between floors is a communicating stair with integrated stadium seating. It leads to the fifth floor, which is a private area for staff. Prior to the renovation this floor was a dark and dismal non-tenant space, housing the building’s mechanical units and plumbing lines. It now encompasses open offices, phone rooms, multiple types of collaborative spaces and mother’s room. The space is brighter and more conducive for work. The renovation maximizes natural light coming from the communicating stair and penthouse light boxes. Additional daylight enters from the corridor leading south; toward the only fifth-floor window framing the Memorial and downtown skyline.

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